Charlie Chaplin’s Iconic Speech for all Humanity from ‘The Great Dictator’

The Great Dictator, a historically significant film as per the modern critics, is a political satire comedy-drama film by comedian Charlie Chaplin, who wrote, directed and produced this iconic film — and was his first true sound film.

In 1997, it was selected as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant” by the Library of Congress for preservation in the United States National Film Registry. Further, it was nominated for several Academy Awards such as Best Actor, Best Writing (Original Screenplay), Best Music (Original Score), etc.

In his 1964 autobiography, Chaplin claims to not have had made the film if he wasn’t aware of the extent of the horrors of the Nazi concentration camps at the time.

Charlie Chaplin’s most timeless message to all of humanity:

I’m sorry but I don’t want to be an emperor. That’s not my business. I don’t want to rule or conquer anyone. I should like to help everyone if possible; Jew, Gentile, black men, white. We all want to help one another. Human beings are like that. We want to live by each other’s happiness, not by each other’s misery. We don’t want to hate and despise one another. In this world there is room for everyone. And the good earth is rich and can provide for everyone. The way of life can be free and beautiful, but we have lost the way.

Greed has poisoned men’s souls; has barricaded the world with hate; has goose-stepped us into misery and bloodshed. We have developed speed, but we have shut ourselves in. Machinery that gives abundance has left us in want. Our knowledge as made us cynical; our cleverness, hard and unkind. We think too much and feel too little. More than machinery we need humanity. More than cleverness, we need kindness and gentleness. Without these qualities, life will be violent and all will be lost. The aeroplane and the radio have brought us closer together. The very nature of these inventions cries out for the goodness in man; cries out for universal brotherhood; for the unity of us all.

Even now my voice is reaching millions throughout the world, millions of despairing men, women, and little children, victims of a system that makes men torture and imprison innocent people. To those who can hear me, I say “Do not despair.” The misery that is now upon us is but the passing of greed, the bitterness of men who fear the way of human progress. The hate of men will pass, and dictators die, and the power they took from the people will return to the people. And so long as men die, liberty will never perish.

Soldiers! Don’t give yourselves to brutes, men who despise you and enslave you; who regiment your lives, tell you what to do, what to think and what to feel! Who drill you, diet you, treat you like cattle, use you as cannon fodder! Don’t give yourselves to these unnatural men—machine men with machine minds and machine hearts! You are not machines! You are not cattle! You are men! You have a love of humanity in your hearts! You don’t hate! Only the unloved hate; the unloved and the unnatural.

Soldiers! Don’t fight for slavery! Fight for liberty! In the seventeenth chapter of St. Luke, it’s written “the kingdom of God is within man”, not one man nor a group of men, but in all men! In you! You, the people, have the power, the power to create machines, the power to create happiness! You, the people, have the power to make this life free and beautiful, to make this life a wonderful adventure. Then in the name of democracy, let us use that power.

Let us all unite. Let us fight for a new world, a decent world that will give men a chance to work, that will give youth a future and old age a security. By the promise of these things, brutes have risen to power. But they lie! They do not fulfill their promise. They never will! Dictators free themselves but they enslave the people! Now let us fight to fulfill that promise! Let us fight to free the world! To do away with national barriers! To do away with greed, with hate and intolerance! Let us fight for a world of reason, a world where science and progress will lead to all men’s happiness.

Soldiers, in the name of democracy, let us all unite!

Jeff Bezos on the Difference Between Cleverness and Kindness at Princeton, 2010

Jeff Bezos, the founder of Amazon.com, stepped on the podium at Princeton in 2010, twenty-four years after his own graduation with a degree in computer science in 1986, to address the graduating class about —

The difference between cleverness and kindness:

What I want to talk to you about today is the difference between gifts and choices.

Cleverness is a gift; kindness is a choice. Gifts are easy — they’re given after all. Choices can be hard. You can seduce yourself with your gifts if you’re not careful, and if you do, it’ll probably be to the detriment of your choices.

Tomorrow, in a very real sense, your life — the life you author from scratch on your own — begins.

How will you use your gifts? What choices will you make?

Will inertia be your guide, or will you follow your passions?

Will you follow dogma, or will you be original?

Will you choose a life of ease, or a life of service and adventure?

Will you wilt under criticism, or will you follow your convictions?

Will you bluff it out when you’re wrong, or will you apologize?

Will you guard your heart against rejection, or will you act when you fall in love?

Will you play it safe, or will you be a little bit swashbuckling?

When it’s tough, will you give up, or will you be relentless?

Will you be a cynic, or will you be a builder?

Will you be clever at the expense of others, or will you be kind?

Jeff compels us to seriously reconsider carving out our own fate by re-writing a great story for ourselves:

I will hazard a prediction. When you are 80 years old and in a quiet moment, a reflection narrating for only yourself — the most personal version of your life story — the telling that will be the most compact and meaningful —will be the series of choices that you’ve made. In the end, we are our choices. Build yourself a great story.

https://youtu.be/vBmavNoChZc

A clip of Jeff Bezos delivering graduation speech at Princeton University in 2010.